Upcoming Webinars


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Growing Your Website from Good to Great
3:00 pm EST/ 2:00 pm CST/ 1:00 pm MST/12:00 pm PST
Thursday, February 22, 2018
NADSA Members:
$25 registration fee
Non-members: $49 registration fee

This session will give you tips and tricks for a successful website. We will talk about best practices for website design and content and how to use your website successfully as part of your integrated online marketing program.

The session will cover the following essentials for success:
• The importance of good design, from making a great first impression to underlying accessibility and usability needs of your visitors.
• The type of content that you should include in your site to achieve your marketing goals.
• How your website can serve as the foundation for your integrated marketing and communications program.

There will be time allotted for questions at the end.

Speaker: Connie Parsons, President and COO of IlluminAge Communication Partners.

About the Speaker:
Connie Parsons has been a marketing communications consultant specializing in the needs of aging services providers for more than 10 years. She has worked with NADSA, state adult day services chapters, and individual adult day services providers on their website programs, search engine optimization, social media and email marketing, including integrating their marketing communications programs. Understanding adult day services, online marketing technology, and the broader network of aging services that work together to support our older adults enables her to provide adult day service providers with the information and tools they can use to develop and grow their online marketing strategies.

 


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NADSA Webinar: Getting Your Adult Day Center Involved in a Social Research Opportunity: Telehealth Caregiver Support & Training
3:00 pm EST/ 2:00 pm CST/ 1:00 pm MST/12:00 pm PST
Tuesday, February 27, 2018
Cost:
Free
This session will give you information on how to get involved and connect your adult day community to a social research opportunity for spousal caregivers living with individuals with memory loss.

The New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI) is an evidence-based program for spousal caregivers and their family members. After a 20+year study, NYUCI has proven many benefits when offered in person. While now being widely implemented in-person, there have been identified barriers, such as travel and geographic distance, that prevent many caregivers from receiving its benefits. To overcome these barriers, the National Institute on Aging is now funding this separate study to evaluate the effectiveness of the NYUCI when it is delivered via teleconference.

As an extension of our mission to improve recruitment, education, and access to research, Recruitment Partners LLC is presenting this opportunity to our adult day care community network. In this webinar, we will talk about:

  • New York University Caregiver Intervention (NYUCI)
  • Who can participate: counselors and caregivers
  • The study design
  • The process for getting involved

There will be time allotted for questions at the end.

Speaker: Erin Beck
Director, Site Recruitment and Management
Recruitment Partners, LLC

About the Speaker:
Ms. Erin Beck has been serving as the Director of Site Recruitment and Management with Recruitment Partners for the past 2 years. She holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and an MPH with a certificate in Health of an Aging Population from Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health. Previously, Ms. Beck has worked closely with the Columbia Aging Center and was a Clarence Pearson Fellow in Global Health and Aging at the American Federation of Aging Research. She has also worked as a Hospital Coordinator and Research Specialist in the University of Pennsylvania Computational Memory Lab, where she was responsible for managing communication among co-investigators, maintaining good standing with IRBs, performing consent with study participants and collecting data for an NIH-funded, multi-site study of human memory.